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Study Spot or Flop?

A variety of students means a variety of environments that work best for each to study in.

Lessons, quizzes and tests, oh my! 

All these things take place within the classroom, where students grind to finish their work. But, even after a long day of school finishes, there is still another task students worry about: homework.

When completing these assignments, students have to keep in mind the materials required–their resources as well as study methods. 

However, another component to take into consideration is where to study. A good study environment allows for increased concentration and improved efficiency, and the variety of places in the school accommodates the multiple types of conditions different students thrive in. 

Study Spots
Library
Reva Mehrotra ‘26 looks at books in the library Oct. 10. After classes students finished their classes, they hung out in the library, completing homework while also socializing with their fellow peers. Mehtrotra went around the bookshelves and looked at different novels. “The library is great because studying with my friends keeps me productive,” Mehrotra said.
Reva Mehrotra ‘26 looks at books in the library Oct. 10. After classes students finished their classes, they hung out in the library, completing homework while also socializing with their fellow peers. Mehtrotra went around the bookshelves and looked at different novels. “The library is great because studying with my friends keeps me productive,” Mehrotra said. (media by Bella Lin)

The library is often crowded with students who wish to study. With many seating areas, as well as an attentive staff team and access to resources, it’s a quality location to get work done. 

The biggest advantage of the library is its low volume levels, which are the quietest during access periods as well as students’ off periods, as there are fewer people. Jennifer Chiu, the Library Media Specialist, described the effort made to keep the environment as silent as possible. 

“We remind students when they walk in the door to keep voices down. We also remind them periodically through the microphone system, but most kids come in here and they’re quiet. It’s just during access that it tends to be more talkative and chatty. We walk around as well to keep voices down,” Chiu said. 

For students who focus best in silent settings, the effort taken to keep students engaged in their assignments and limit distractions could prove helpful. 

Students also prefer studying in the library due to its academic environment. Josette Wu ‘26 often comes to this area to study. 

“[The library] has books, which I associate with studying. It makes me feel studious. It also has nice plants,” Wu said.

While the staff put in the effort to keep the space as tame as possible, it’s a common study spot and therefore will be unavoidably crowded at times. 

“Access is the most challenging time because we get between 130 and 150 students during that time. We have to monitor the doors coming in. It is a constant reminder to keep kids on task and stay quiet. Sometimes we have to ask students to leave,” Chiu said. 

A crowded environment also means table space isn’t always available. 

Besides these factors, the library also includes a close community and staff. 

“One of my favorite things is getting to know the students, talking about things that they’re interested in, books that they like to read. Just trying to form a connection academically with the students,” Chiu said.

Cafeteria
Hannah Zhang ‘26 and Olivia Fang ‘26 study together during lunch in the cafeteria Nov. 10. Zhang reviewed material from her AP Computer Science class before an upcoming quiz.  “I like studying in the cafeteria because I’m able to work while talking with friends,” Zhang said. “If I need help with something I can ask them and when I dont have homework I can talk with them.
Hannah Zhang ‘26 and Olivia Fang ‘26 study together during lunch in the cafeteria Nov. 10. Zhang reviewed material from her AP Computer Science class before an upcoming quiz. “I like studying in the cafeteria because I’m able to work while talking with friends,” Zhang said. “If I need help with something I can ask them and when I don’t have homework I can talk with them.” (media by Bella Lin)

The cafeteria doesn’t just have to be a spot to eat lunch, it can also be utilized for school work.

One advantage this environment offers is the level of freedom when completing work. There is little requirement to remain quiet or seated, so students can walk around and socialize if they wish to. Hannah Zhang ’26 studies in the cafeteria during Access periods. 

“This spot offers a place where I can talk to my friends, socialize and eat while studying,” Zhang said. “It’s just a lot more free than other places.” 

Another advantage of the cafeteria is the abundance of seating. While it gets quite busy and many people take up tables during lunch, there is rarely no space to sit down. It is a great study spot substitute for when the library is full or unavailable. 

More open spots also means more space to sit close to your friends, creating a closer and more interactive study environment. 

“I study here because my friends are here, and there's usually no space in the library,” Zhang said. 

The main disadvantage of so much freedom is the lack of discipline. It’s easy to lose focus and become distracted, decreasing productivity levels. Besides this con, the cafeteria can serve as a quick option for when other study spots are unavailable. 

Room 4101
Saanvi Cooduvalli ‘26 studies Honors Chemistry in room 4101 Nov. 9. Many students sat in the high chairs and studied material from their chemistry courses as well as completed homework from other classes. Honors Chemistry teacher Kerry Reilly went around assisting students who had questions about their assignments and quizzes. “The chemistry room is very refreshing,” Cooduvalli said.
Saanvi Cooduvalli ‘26 studies Honors Chemistry in room 4101 Nov. 9. Many students sat in the high chairs and studied material from their chemistry courses as well as completed homework from other classes. Honors Chemistry teacher Kerry Reilly went around assisting students who had questions about their assignments and quizzes. “The chemistry room is very refreshing,” Cooduvalli said. (media by Bella Lin)

Other great areas to study are classrooms. During Access, there are a variety of teachers to refer to depending on the subject one chooses to work on, each classroom offering different resources and atmospheres. 

An example of these types of study environments is Room 4101, the classroom of Honors and AP Chemistry teacher Kerry Reilly.  

The largest advantage of studying in room 4104, as well as other classrooms, is the decreased crowding and accessibility to help. Because there are so many rooms in the school, a single class won’t be too full during Access. Teachers are also able to give students increased attention and be more thorough when providing assistance. 

 “The environment has to do with me being in the room, moving around and checking on students, making sure everybody gets what they need,” Reilly said. 

Saanvi Cooduvalli ‘26, a student who often goes to Room 4101 to study, also appreciates the accessibility to assistance. 

“I choose to study here because of the friendly environment and the support from Mrs. Reilly,” Cooduvalli said. 

Students can also benefit from the communities classrooms offer, creating a much more social and interactive environment. Students can learn more about their teachers and classmates while completing their assignments. 

“I think this spot offers a friendly relationship between my teacher and I because Mrs. Reilly helps me understand concepts,” Cooduvalli said. 

By utilizing the many school classrooms and teachers and their study environments, such as room 4101, students can study their individual subjects at a deeper level, as well as create connections with their teachers and fellow peers.  

“[My favorite thing is] that students feel safe here, and comfortable. Some students see it as a home in the building. It’s my space,” Reilly said.

The school offers a plethora of spaces to study, and it’s up to the students to utilize them. This article goes over just a few examples of places to complete work, but there are still plenty of other options available to students.

Every study spot has its own pros and cons, so it’s important for one to understand which environment suits them and their needs best. They should consider the volume levels they prefer, the social interactions they want, their discipline levels, etc. 

Would they rather rely on one study spot, or switch around through multiple? Do they want a more isolated environment or an interactive one? Every student is different, but the variety of areas in the school does well to accommodate.

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