Recent Scores
  • May 6 / Varsity BaseballRock Canyon High School - 17, Highlands Ranch High School - 1
  • May 1 / Varsity BaseballRock Canyon High School - 12, Heritage High School - 2
  • Apr 30 / JV BaseballRock Canyon High School - 11, Castle View High School - 9
  • Apr 30 / Varsity Boys VolleyballRock Canyon High School - 0, Grandview High School - 3
  • Apr 30 / Varsity Track and FieldRock Canyon High School - 9, Niwot Invite - 35
  • Apr 29 / Varsity Girls LacrosseRock Canyon High School - 12, Pine Creek High School - 6
  • Apr 27 / Varsity Track and FieldRock Canyon High School - 3rd, Liberty Bell Invite - 55
  • Apr 27 / Varsity Track and FieldRock Canyon High School - Did Not Place, Randall Hess Roughrider Invite -
  • Apr 26 / JV Boys LacrosseRock Canyon High School - 2, Erie High School - 3
  • Apr 26 / Varsity Track and FieldRock Canyon High School - 3rd, Liberty Bell Invite - 55
Rock Canyon High School's Student Newspaper

the Rock Online

Rock Canyon High School's Student Newspaper

the Rock Online

Rock Canyon High School's Student Newspaper

the Rock Online

A Glimpse at the Eclipse

Take a (film-glass protected) peek at today’s historic solar eclipse and the school’s festivities.

At 12:15 p.m. during third period April 8, people flooded the halls, film glasses in hand. It was not lunch time nor had an early dismissal been called, rather, hundreds of students and staff were headed to view the solar eclipse.

The light shining through the branches of a tree outside the school creates crescent-shaped shadows in the shape of the eclipse April 8. Students also used pinhole viewers to create shadows of the eclipse of the ground as another way to safely view the sun. (media by Claire Bauer)

Colorado saw a partial solar eclipse across the state, visible between 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. with the maximum partial eclipse taking place around 12:40 p.m. During the peak of the eclipse, the sky darkened, temperatures dropped and the light created different shaped shadows on the ground. 

The partial eclipse ranged from 58% to 78% coverage across the state, with about 65.9% of the sun covered from the school’s angle, according to National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Eclipse Explorer Map.

“I think [the eclipse] was pretty unique since it’s been a long time since I’ve seen anything like it. Last time we saw it was in 2017,” Tristan Llado ‘26 said. “I think it was a unique experience, especially this year. I didn’t really expect it to look how it did. I kind of expected a more total eclipse, but I guess we’re not on like the trajectory so that kind of explains why.”

The image shows an up-close shot of the partial solar eclipse observable in Colorado April 8. Colorado was only able to observe a partial solar eclipse while other parts of the country saw total coverage. (media by Ella Heimer)

The solar eclipse comes after the last visible one took place in 2017, and one in 1979 before that. All contiguous 48 states had visibility of the eclipse, with total visibility zones stretching from Maine to Texas.

Through science teacher Jack Van Natta’s telescope, Allie Emery ’27 observes the solar eclipse during third period April 8. The solar eclipse lasted between about 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. with the maximum partial eclipse taking place around 12:40 p.m. About 65.9% of the sun was covered from the school’s angle. (media by Dee Lee)

In response to the eclipse, some Colorado schools prohibited students from viewing the eclipse. National Public Radio (NPR) reported that Longmont’s St. Vrain Valley School District barred students from viewing the eclipse at school and required extra precaution in regards to time spent outside. But here, that was not the case.

Contrasting schools such as St. Vrain Valley, the school saw students pile in the upper lot area of the school to view the eclipse.

Students passed around eclipse glasses, made pinhole viewers and science teacher Jack Van Natta brought a telescope for students to view the eclipse through.

“I feel very lucky [to watch the eclipse at school] and I don’t know why they don’t let [the students watch] because it’s science and science is fun. I love science,” Sophia Foldery ‘26 said.

School Resource Officers (SROs) Mark Adams and Biagio Burriesci view the solar eclipse through film viewing glasses by the flag pole April 8. The SROs walked around outside with about 100 students and teachers that left class to watch the eclipse. “It’s just something that you don’t see often and when you get to see it it’s really cool,” Adams said. (media by Claire Bauer)

Solar eclipses usually take place every one to three years but are usually only visible from the ocean or the earth’s poles. NASA reports that the next visible solar eclipse in the contiguous United States after today’s won’t take place until Aug. 23, 2044.

“It’s just something that you don’t see often and when you get to see it it’s really cool. If you miss it, you got to wait, it takes a while. It’s pretty amazing so if you wanna come out and see it, I think it’s a good thing to take a break from class,” School Resource Officer (SRO) Mark Adams said.

Leave a Comment
Donate to the Rock Online
$125
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

Your donation will support the student journalists of Rock Canyon High School. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment, submit to competitions, travel to events and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to the Rock Online
$125
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

Comments (0)

All the Rock Online Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *