Inside The Stats (w/ Kishan Vahalia): Key Takeaways from the Madness of March

See how the 2022 NCAA March Madness Tournament turned out!

Photo+by%3A+Jack+Keough

photo by Jack Keough

Photo by: Jack Keough

by Kishan Vahalia, Reporter

You print out your NCAA March Madness Bracket, thoroughly deciding who will win each game. You sit back and watch the madness, from the “upsets” to the game-winners.

March Madness is a college basketball tournament, consisting of the best 68 teams in the nation. Each exhibition game is played until one champion college team remains.

Fun Facts:

March Madness is one of the most-streamed sporting events every single year
There are 68 college basketball teams that play in the tournament each year
According to BOYDSBETS.COM, about 70 million March Madness bracket contests are entered each year (boydsbets.com)
UCLA is the college basketball team that has won the most titles (11)
The term “March Madness” was coined by Sportscaster Brent Musburger when he uttered it during a broadcast in 1939 (docsports.com)
According to ncaa.com, the odds of picking a perfect bracket is 1 in 9.2 quintillion chances
This year’s “Final Four” games were held at Caesers Superdome, New Orleans, LA
This year’s Championship game was held at Caesers Superdome, New Orleans, LA

Memorable Moments from the Tournament:

Kansas wins the Division I National Championship (April 4), coming back from a 15 point differential (largest comeback in title game history)
St. Peters (15th seed) defeated top seeded teams (Kentucky, Murray St., Purdue,) to reach the “Elite Eight” for the first time in franchise history (March 27), making a “Cinderella Run”


Arkansas beats Gonzaga (March 24), the top prospect team in the “Sweet Sixteen”
North Carolina, the 8th seed team reaches the championship, to face Kansas (April 4)
Duke’s legendary head coach Mike Krzyzwski leaves a NCAA legacy, coaching his last game in the Final Four (13th)
North Carolina & Duke, two rival teams played in the NCAA “FInal Four” for the first time in forever (April 2)
Top prospect teams, such as Gonzaga, Arizona, and Auburn were eliminated from the tournament by lower-seed teams
First tournament since 2019, where fans could spectate in the stands

My Take:

This year’s tournament was exhilarating to watch. The lower-seeded teams made remarkable runs, by “upsetting” top prospects like Kentucky, Purdue, and Auburn. Although this season was unforgettable, my bracket was completely destroyed. I had top prospect teams in my “Final Four,” which were Gonzaga, Arizona, Auburn, and Kentucky.

During the first round of the tournament, St. Peters beat Kentucky in overtime, which was considered the season’s best tournament upset. Although the game was thrilling to watch, I was upset because I had Kentucky going really far in my bracket.

Next, I had Auburn going to the finals, because of their prospective players. Despite the fact that Auburn had good players, they lost to Miami in the second round of the tournament, so I knew that my bracket was going down from there.

Lastly, both Arizona and Gonzaga, which were top prospect teams, lost in the “Final Four,” which screwed up my hopes of even doing well in the bracket. Despite all of this, the tournament was still enjoyable to watch.

Jag Take:

“I had Arizona winning, which means I officially lost,” Kavini Giri ‘25 said. “Yet, the unpredictability is the best part about these games.”

“I enjoyed this season’s tournament,” Peter Graham ‘25 said. “What shocked me the most this year was St. Peters’ and Miami’s run.”

“It was a great year for March Madness,” Nate Hadi ‘24 said. “Definitely not a disappointment.”

Sources: ncaa.com, play.ncaa.com

 

This poll has ended.

How Accurate was your March Madness Bracket?

Loading...

Sorry, there was an error loading this poll.